20737 13 Mile Rd. Roseville, MI 48066

43570 Garfield Clinton twp., MI 48038

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Posts for: June, 2012

By David A.Susko DDS, PC
June 23, 2012
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   oral piercings  
OralPiercingsmdashTongueampLipBoltsTrendyButDangerous

Tongue and other piercings are a current fad or trend, but can often lead to unforeseen problems.

Piercing the tongue and installing a metal ornament called a tongue bolt commonly leads to chipped teeth, sensitivity, and pain. More frequently, it can cause problems with the gums, such as recession, inflammation, infection, bone loss, and even nerve damage.

In one case reported by the American Medical Association, a teenager suffered 20 to 30 daily electrical shocks in many areas of her face after having her tongue pierced and installing a tongue bolt. A neurologist found that the bolt irritated the nerves to her tongue, causing the symptoms. After the bolt was removed, the shocks and symptoms ceased and her tongue healed.

Having the bolts placed may be painful. The tongue is rich in nerves and blood vessels and a lot of bleeding can occur, which can be difficult to stop. Think about how painful it is when you bite your tongue or lip accidentally. And tongue and lip bolts are not generally placed by health professionals or under sterile conditions.

If you are considering getting an oral piercing, make an appointment with us to discuss all the possible ramifications before you make the decision to go ahead. If you already have an oral piercing, be sure to come in for frequent checkups.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about oral piercings. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article on “Body Piercings and Teeth: The dangers of tongue and lip piercing.”


By David A.Susko DDS, PC
June 15, 2012
Category: Oral Health
YouThinkYouHaveSleepApneaWhatNow

Nearly everyone has snored at some point in life. However, if your sleeping partner routinely tells you that you suffer from this problem, you really should take action to confirm or deny your suspicions. You may be like one of the 50 to 70 million people in the US alone that suffer from Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA), a medical condition in which the upper airway (the back of your throat) collapses during sleep thus limiting your intake of oxygen. And this condition is serious. If left untreated, OSA can lead to a stroke, impotence, an irregular heartbeat, heart attacks, high blood pressure, and other forms of heart disease.

The first and most important step you should take if you snore is to obtain a thorough examination by both your primary-care physician and our office. We have completed specialized training in sleep medicine so that we can not only diagnose but also thoroughly treat your sleep disorders.

If you are diagnosed with this problem, relax. We have many ways we can treat your condition. One of the most common methods is to provide you with oral appliance therapy. This first line of treatment involves our making a customized oral appliance (mouthpiece) that will hold your lower jaw forward. By doing this, we can move your tongue away from the back of your throat so that your airway is less likely to get blocked while you sleep. (It is this blockage that causes the infamous snoring sound.)

Another option we may consider using to treat your sleep apnea if it is moderate to advanced is a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine. These machines require you to sleep with a mask over your nose and/or mouth and produce continuous pressure in your windpipe so that your tongue is forced forward away from your airway. Not only can these machines potentially eliminate your snoring, but they can also give you the restful night's sleep that you have been missing.

The last and most permanent solution for treating certain non-responsive cases of sleep apnea is surgery. This option is typically reserved for the most advanced cases to eliminate or reduce an obstruction to the airway.

Contact us today to discuss your questions about sleep apnea or to schedule an appointment. You can also learn more about sleep apnea when you continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sleep Disorders & Dentistry.”


By David A.Susko DDS, PC
June 07, 2012
Category: Oral Health
FrequentlyAskedQuestionsAboutHeartandGumDiseases

Recent research has revealed that there is a link between cardiovascular (“cardio” – heart; “vascular” – blood vessel) disease (CVD) and periodontal (gum) disease. The link is Inflammation. This is why it is important to learn more about this important relationship so that you can take proactive steps to improving your health and life.

What causes periodontal disease?
Simply put, irregular and ineffective brushing and flossing are the root causes of periodontal disease. Over time and when bacterial biofilms (dental plaque) are left unchecked, they lead to the emergence of a small set of highly pathogenic (“patho” – disease; “genic” – causing) organisms that are consistently associated with periodontitis (“peri” – gum; “odont” – tooth; “itis” – inflammation) or gum disease.

Is periodontal disease common or am I one of the few who have it?
It is a quite common disease, with mild to moderate forms of it impacting 30 to 50% of US adults. More severe cases affect 5 to 15%. One of the reasons these numbers are so high is because periodontal disease is a silent, painless disease that often occurs without any symptoms.

So how does my gum disease link to potential heart disease?
Inflammation is a characteristic of chronic disease. People with moderate to severe periodontitis have increased levels of systemic (general body) inflammation. If left untreated, the same bacterial strains that are commonly found in periodontal pockets surrounding diseased teeth have been found in blood vessel plaques of people with CVD.

This all sounds bad...is there any good news?
Yes! Research has revealed that if periodontal disease is treated, inflammation and infection can be reduced. This also reduces the risk for heart attacks and strokes, both of which are common results of CVD. All it may take is a thorough exam for gum disease and thorough dental cleaning. During your exam, we can also make sure you are brushing and flossing properly so that you are effectively removing bacterial biofilm. But if you have severe periodontal disease, you may need deeper cleanings and more advanced treatment to save your teeth and your heart.

To learn more on this subject, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Link Between Heart & Gum Diseases.” You can also contact us today with any questions or to schedule an appointment.




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(586) 294-7810

Clinton Township Office
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228-2460